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I was born October 24th, 1916 in Sedgewick, Alberta. That means that I just turned 100 years old! Im starting to feel it, too (laughs). Dad was struggling in Nebraska to make a living. He moved to California and eventually saw an advertisement for a homestead of 160 acres in Alberta, Canada for $10. He took it! Thats how we came to Sedgewick to farm.

The first thing I bought with my own money was a mink. I was 15 years old. I paid $60 for her and she was pregnant already. ($60 in 1931 has the same buying power as $881 in 2016). I got the money by gleaning the wheat fields where my dad was a thrasher. He was a good man. My brother and I both picked up the wheat and dad took it to the elevator. I bought a mink and my brother bought the most beautiful riding horse.

I found some mice nests in the straw and thought I would feed the baby mice to my mink. When I went back the next day to see if she ate them, they were all still there. Six tiny, naked mice. I called my dad over to look at them... Those arent mice, Bernard, those are baby mink! Dad and I grew the mink farm to more than 200 mink. It was always a good way to earn some extra money.

I only had a grade eight education, but I wanted to go to Bible School. I was 21 years old when I headed off to Bible School. I had seen a vision and it was me above a picture of a missionarys head. I was preaching to Africans. I never let this slip from my mind and dreamed of the day when I could be a missionary in Africa.

It took a special woman to join me on this mission. Her name was Beth. Before we married, she was a pastor - marrying, burying and preaching. We set out with three children to travel by steamship to Capetown, South Africa 9 years after our marriage in 1939. We served five terms together in South Africa and shared the good news of Jesus and the Word of God to many who worked in the mines. I worked with Early King who had been in CapeTown for 10 years already.

The mines were huge.They were mining for gold. We would spend time speaking to the miners after they got off work. We took them into the hall, ministered to their souls with Gods word and gave them Bibles. They lived in compounds and hostels. These were not good places to live. Many of the men came from other African countries and their wives were not with them. 

The mines treated the men well. They had a huge, beautiful camp kitchen and they let our church use it and the dining room for meetings. The men begged us to come and share the Word of God. we had an interpreter who knew seven different languages. I have very fond memories of those times.

I have written many of my stories in this short biography. One story that I remember is when we were invited by a miner to come to his village in Mozambique. We drove as far as we could go in the jeep and then we walked through deep sand for a long way/ When we arrived, they wanted to kill their goat. No!, I said, That is your livelihood - you can not kill it! We had chicken for dinner. Soon after, we gave out Bibles in their language. They were so excited to have a Bible in their language that they built a shed and put it on a table in that shed. They said, whoever wants to read it can take it and bring it back. At that time, reading the Bible in your own home was not allowed by the Roman Catholic church and bringing a Bible into the country was forbidden.

We built churches, schools and helped many many people to find their way out of the hopelessness of alcohol and other difficulties. I lived by the Holy Spirits direction and God provided for our needs without fail. When my dear Beth was dying, I built her a brand new house. The houses were being torn down in Johannesburg, so I drove there many times and carried back the free bricks. I brought 1,000 at a time, eventually hauling 28,000 bricks. I hired men to build a four bedroom home for her. She lived there one and a half years. She died and was buried on South African soil, where her heart belonged.

I served in South Africa for six terms. That was about 30 years. The last time, my second wife, Mary, came along with me. It was good for me to have a partner in this ministry work.

During the uprisings in Soweto during the anti-Apartheid movement, I was not afraid. People asked me, Do you carry a gun? I said, No, theyll kill me just to get the gun! We werent bothered by Apartheid. I think that is because the African people were our friends. We always lived among them and with them.

Instead, I went into the communities and was allowed through the gangs who blocked the road. I would hold out my thumb like this thumbs up. This was the sign that meant Victory for the Africans. Sometimes, the boys would recognize me as Missionary Hunter or Brother Hunter and called off the armed gang members. Most of my dear friends were African. I loved the people and I loved the land.

Not so long ago, my son, Bruce (hes a pretty old man now, too! - laughs) was entering a lavatory at the same time as a black South African. He waved the other man in first. This man looked at him and said, Where are you from? Bruce said, America - Canada. Then he asked, You wouldnt happen to be a Hunter, would you? My dad has been talking about his good friend, Bernie Hunter.

Yes!, said Bruce, Bernie Hunter is my father.

Not long afterward, by the magic of the mobile phones, my son was speaking to my dear friend, Philip Malevay. I had him many times in my car. He was one of the Executives in the African ministry group. We served together for many years.
This story makes me very happy. Philip and I were dear friends.

Should a young person aspire to become a missionary? Why not? If God is calling you to do so, you should not disobey. Start out small, trust Him for that. See how He supplies, because he never fails.

WRITE A COMMENT TO ENCOURAGE BERNIE HUNTER IN HIS 100th YEAR OF LIFE!

Humans of Menno Place in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

I was born October 24th, 1916 in Sedgewick, Alberta. That means that I just turned 100 years old! I'm starting to feel it, too (laughs). Dad was struggling in Nebraska to make a living. He moved to California and eventually saw an advertisement for a homestead of 160 acres in Alberta, Canada for $10. He took it! That's how we came to Sedgewick to farm.

The first thing I bought with my own money was a mink. I was 15 years old. I paid $60 for her and she was pregnant already. ($60 in 1931 has the same buying power as $881 in 2016). I got the money by gleaning the wheat fields where my dad was a thrasher. He was a good man. My brother and I both picked up the wheat and dad took it to the elevator. I bought a mink and my brother bought the most beautiful riding horse.

I found some mice nests in the straw and thought I would feed the baby mice to my mink. When I went back the next day to see if she ate them, they were all still there. Six tiny, naked mice. I called my dad over to look at them... "Those aren't mice, Bernard, those are baby mink!" Dad and I grew the mink farm to more than 200 mink. It was always a good way to earn some extra money.

I only had a grade eight education, but I wanted to go to Bible School. I was 21 years old when I headed off to Bible School. I had seen a vision and it was me above a picture of a missionary's head. I was preaching to Africans. I never let this slip from my mind and dreamed of the day when I could be a missionary in Africa.

It took a special woman to join me on this mission. Her name was Beth. Before we married, she was a pastor - marrying, burying and preaching. We set out with three children to travel by steamship to Capetown, South Africa 9 years after our marriage in 1939. We served five terms together in South Africa and shared the good news of Jesus and the Word of God to many who worked in the mines. I worked with Early King who had been in CapeTown for 10 years already.

The mines were huge.They were mining for gold. We would spend time speaking to the miners after they got off work. We took them into the hall, ministered to their souls with God's word and gave them Bibles. They lived in compounds and hostels. These were not good places to live. Many of the men came from other African countries and their wives were not with them.

The mines treated the men well. They had a huge, beautiful camp kitchen and they let our church use it and the dining room for meetings. The men begged us to come and share the Word of God. we had an interpreter who knew seven different languages. I have very fond memories of those times.

I have written many of my stories in this short biography. One story that I remember is when we were invited by a miner to come to his village in Mozambique. We drove as far as we could go in the jeep and then we walked through deep sand for a long way/ When we arrived, they wanted to kill their goat. "No!", I said, "That is your livelihood - you can not kill it!" We had chicken for dinner. Soon after, we gave out Bibles in their language. They were so excited to have a Bible in their language that they built a shed and put it on a table in that shed. They said, "whoever wants to read it can take it and bring it back." At that time, reading the Bible in your own home was not allowed by the Roman Catholic church and bringing a Bible into the country was forbidden.

We built churches, schools and helped many many people to find their way out of the hopelessness of alcohol and other difficulties. I lived by the Holy Spirit's direction and God provided for our needs without fail. When my dear Beth was dying, I built her a brand new house. The houses were being torn down in Johannesburg, so I drove there many times and carried back the free bricks. I brought 1,000 at a time, eventually hauling 28,000 bricks. I hired men to build a four bedroom home for her. She lived there one and a half years. She died and was buried on South African soil, where her heart belonged.

I served in South Africa for six terms. That was about 30 years. The last time, my second wife, Mary, came along with me. It was good for me to have a partner in this ministry work.

During the uprisings in Soweto during the anti-Apartheid movement, I was not afraid. People asked me, "Do you carry a gun?" I said, "No, they'll kill me just to get the gun!" We weren't bothered by Apartheid. I think that is because the African people were our friends. We always lived among them and with them.

Instead, I went into the communities and was allowed through the gangs who blocked the road. I would hold out my thumb like this "thumbs up". This was the sign that meant "Victory for the Africans". Sometimes, the boys would recognize me as Missionary Hunter or Brother Hunter and called off the armed gang members. Most of my dear friends were African. I loved the people and I loved the land.

Not so long ago, my son, Bruce (he's a pretty old man now, too! - laughs) was entering a lavatory at the same time as a black South African. He waved the other man in first. This man looked at him and said, "Where are you from?" Bruce said, "America - Canada." Then he asked, "You wouldn't happen to be a Hunter, would you? My dad has been talking about his good friend, Bernie Hunter."

"Yes!", said Bruce, "Bernie Hunter is my father."

Not long afterward, by the magic of the mobile phones, my son was speaking to my dear friend, Philip Malevay. I had him many times in my car. He was one of the Executives in the African ministry group. We served together for many years.
This story makes me very happy. Philip and I were dear friends.

Should a young person aspire to become a missionary? Why not? If God is calling you to do so, you should not disobey. Start out small, trust Him for that. See how He supplies, because he never fails.

WRITE A COMMENT TO ENCOURAGE BERNIE HUNTER IN HIS 100th YEAR OF LIFE!
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Melanie Rodgers, Val Carey and 23 others like this

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Humans of Menno PlaceBernie shares John 3:16 in the whistling language of South Africa. How do you spell this language? Shangaman?

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Humans of Menno PlaceBernie, about 30 years ago - this is his short biography.

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Winnifred DueckWhat a rich, wonderful life!

5 days ago
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Marina HamiltonAmazing! Way to listen to God Bernie! Oh the stories you must have! ❤️ may the Lord continue to bless you abundantly!!

5 days ago
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Linda MillsWhat a wonderful example of discipleship. So glad you listened to the H. S. prompting & followed His leading. God bless you.

5 days ago
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Jocelyn FlackWhat a beautiful life, this is inspiring. Thank you for sharing.

5 days ago
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Kori Templeton UnrauHe as as sweet as he looks!! I always loved hearing about Bernie & Mary's experiences in Africa. Happy 100th Birthday Mr. Hunter!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Bonnie BorowetzHow wonderful! I attended the same church as Bernie for many years ... so nice to see his story here!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Tannis TrinderGod Bless you dear man!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Cynthia N GaryThat is a wonderful testimony to the goodness, leading, provision and protection of God. Thank you for sharing your inspiring testimony. I''m sending it to my kids!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Enid LuitenHow beautiful are the feet of those who bring the good news of the gospel! Bless your feet, Bernie! You are a blessing to many!

5 days ago
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Judy VerhagenWhat a special man and testimonie

5 days ago
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Cherrylin CarambasHappy birthday, Bernie! God bless yr missionary heart and truly a great servant of God!

4 days ago
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Kevin LangelaarHappy birthday mr hunter from an old neighbour

4 days ago
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Yvette HodgkinsonInteresting and uplifting story. Good work

4 days ago
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Dawn MarazziA very precious man who I have had the privlege to serve!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Cindy Robertson ReisigWhat a dear dear man you are!! Bless you!!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Monica NeufeldBeautiful

4 days ago   ·  1
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Jeff SherwinA life well lived.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Sue WestThanks for sharing this amazing life story. God Bless you!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Diane VanderboomI was touched to read your story! Thank-you for sharing it! I'm sure you have been a blessing to many and God will welcome you home with many crowns!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Marlene NelmesHappy birthday Bernie! Beautiful story!!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Deanna K. Antoshhappy belated Birthday!!! and thank you for sharing your story. what a full and amazing testimony!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Lorna GoodwinLoved reading your story!! Happy Birthday!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Julene Weisbrod HunterWhat a wonderful detail testimony of God's faithfulness.....it is good to trust the Lord.

4 days ago   ·  1
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